ComplianceNet weekly review (April 19th, 2015)

1024px-Palazzo_Montecitorio_Rom_2009-2.jpg

("Palazzo Montecitorio Rom 2009" di Manfred Heyde - Opera propria. Con licenza CC BY-SA 3.0 tramite Wikimedia Commons - http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Palazzo_Montecitorio_Rom_2009.jpg...)

Week: from April 12 to April 19th 2015

A concise summary of major news and updates in the Italian regulatory compliance landscape

Executive Summary

  1. The Italian Parliament has not ratified the FATCA agreement yet. It’s causing problems for financial intermediaries (April 15th, 2015)
  2. The action of the “Guardia di Finanza” related to law 231/01 on administrative liability (April 15th, 2015)
  3. Self laundering, first reflections on Italian jurisdiction (April 15th, 2015)
  4. Italy at the mercy of lobby and conflicts of interest (April 17th, 2015)
  5. Privacy: new requirements about use of cookies in Web sites from June 3rd, 2015
  6. The Italian AML Supevisory authorities opinions on virtual currencies (April 18th, 2015)

The Italian Parliament has not ratified the FATCA agreement yet. It’s causing problems for financial intermediaries (April 15th, 2015)

In Italy the legislative process to definitely approve the Bill for the ratification of FATCA  (Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act) continues slowly and after nine months of delay it will have retroactive effect from July 1st, 2014; it is causing operational and legal difficulties for Italian financial intermediaries.
Despite last April 8th the examination at the united Commissions of the Senate has been completed, the final discussion in Parliament is not scheduled yet and there are still many unclear implementation issues.
Due to the high impact on the internal procedures that intermediaries must put in place and the timing imposed by increasingly stringent international regulations, the nervousness of the operators is justified: they have to implement the recommended adjustments even before the ratification of national laws and at the same time face the difficulties created by the same authorities, not sufficiently responsive to guarantee the conditions to manage costs and appropriate compliance risk.

Link

The action of the “Guardia di Finanza” related to law 231/01 on administrative liability (April 15th, 2015)

On April 8th 2015, the “Guardia di Finanza” (Gdf) released its “2014 Report” which also includes a section dedicated to the procedures required by Legislative Decree 231/01.
This legislation provides for the punishment of the companies for several kinds of crimes committed by directors, officers or employees.
The law gives companies the opportunity to escape these charges, providing proper organizational models of control and risk management.
But the 231 models, as is clear from the checks, are in many cases fictitious, or prepared “on paper” but lacking a real capacity for monitoring and prevention.
In this context, in the course of the 219 procedures performed in 2014, the GdF reported 555 subjects to the prosecuting authorities and made seizures for 62 million euros.

Annexes

  • Rapporto Annuale (pdf, 28 M 66 pp.)
  • Comunicato stampa (pdf, 316 K, 1 pag.)
  • Video (link is external)

Link

Self laundering, first reflections on Italian jurisdiction (April 15th, 2015)

On April 13th, 2015 was held the conference "Anti-money laundering in the public administration. The case of Milan’s city".
In his intervention Nicola Mainieri, Bank of Italy’s manager, underlined that the new “self-laundering” offense probably will be much more widespread than money laundering.
In Italy the crime of self laundering was introduced in the criminal justice with the law 186/2014 (law on voluntary disclosure) and is effective from January 1st 2015.
The self laundering is connected to money laundering but it also applies when the offender or laundering is not due or is not punishable, or miss a condition of admissibility.
Then here, the self laundering remains alive even when its “connected” money laundering offense has lapsed.
Moreover, the article 170 of the Italian Penal Code states that "when a crime is a prerequisite for another offense, the cause that extinguishes does not extend to the other crime."
Finally a 2014 verdict expressed by the Italian Supreme Court confirmed that the extinction (for example, by prescription) of unintentional offense for money laundering hass no effect on the configurability of recycling.
Even more so the principle could be extended to self-laundering with disruptive consequences.

Link

Italy at the mercy of lobby and conflicts of interest (April 17th, 2015)

According to the report "Lobbying in Europe" published by Transparency International, Italy is one of the most underdeveloped countries dealing with conflicts of interest and the power of the lobbies.
The report draws up a countries’ rank based on three macro-indicators:

  • transparency relations between politicians and lobbyists;
  • regulation on the ethical conduct of lobbyists (integrity);
  • opening of the public power to the pluralism of voices and interests (equal access).

Europe is back respect US and Canada: only seven countries have a norm on lobby: Austria, France, Ireland, Lithuania, Poland, Slovenia (only one which has a "score" greater than 50 percent) and Britain, systems in which there is a form of registration of lobbyists and, in most cases, even an obligation to periodically communicate their activities.
In Italy in 2014 the government established the National Anti-Corruption Authority led by Raffaele Cantone and now the Senate is discussing a law on the lobby composed by fifteen articles.
The first article provides that the lobbying must "comply with the principles of advertising’s ethical code, democratic participation, transparency and disclose of political decisions in order to ensure more information related to politicians and their choices."
Then there is the obligation for lobbyists to "prepare a periodic activity report", while Article 10 provides for the obligation for public decision-makers "to disclose the activities of interest representation, and specify it in an explanatory memorandum or in the preamble of legislation and administrative measures."
Finally article 11 makes lobbying activities incompatible with journalism.

Annexes

Link

Privacy: new requirements about use of cookies in Web sites from June 3rd, 2015

A year ago, on June 3rd 2014, the Italian Data Privacy Authority (DPA) published a “regulation” that requires new obligations related to the use of cookies on websites.

What are cookies?

Cookies are small text files that are sent to the user’s terminal equipment (usually to the user’s browser) by visited websites; they are stored in the user’s terminal equipment to be then re-transmitted to the websites on the user’s subsequent visits to those websites. When navigating a website, a user may happen to receive cookies from other websites or web servers, which are the so-called "third party" cookies. This happens because visited website may contain items such as images, maps, sound files, links to individual web pages on different domains that are located on servers other than the one where the page being visited is stored.
Cookies are present as a rule in substantial numbers in each user’s browser and at times they remain stored for long. They are used for several purposes ranging from IT authentication to the monitoring of  browsing sessions up to the storage of specific information on user configurations in accessing a given server, and so on.

DPA: “Simplified arrangements to provide information and obtain consent regarding cookies” of May 8th 2014

The DPA’s regulation, published in the Official Gazette of June 3rd  2014, strengthened the rules on online privacy and especially about the use of cookies and similar systems: Internet users should be better informed about the existence of such systems and about what happens to their data.
It will be illegal to use cookies in the absence of consent, especially if used to collect important and sensitive information without the knowledge of the users on their tastes, their habits and their choices.
DPA has identified two main categories of cookies:

  • technical cookies
  • profiling cookies

Profiling cookies are aimed at creating user profiles.
They are used to send ads messages in line with the preferences shown by the user during navigation.
In the light of the highly invasive nature of these cookies vis-à-vis users’ private sphere, Italian and European legislation requires users to be informed appropriately on their use so as to give their valid consent.

Annex

Simplified Arrangements to Provide Information and Obtain Consent Regarding Cookies - 8 may 2014 

Link

The Italian AML Supevisory authorities opinions on virtual currencies (April 18th, 2015)

A summary of Italian AML Supevisory authorities opinions about Bitcoin and other virtual currencies with the statements of Bank of Italy and UIF, the Italian Financial Intelligence Unit,  on this matter.

  • Bank of Italy, Supervisory Bullettin n.1 2015, “Virtual currencies – Communication”, Italian, 30 January 2015 (pdf, 69 K, 2 pp.)
  • Bank of Italy, "Avvertenza sull’utilizzo delle cosiddette valute virtuali", Italian, 30 January 2015 (pdf, 180 K, 3 pp.)
  • UIF, Unità di Informazioni Finanziaria, “Anomalous use of virtual currencies”, Italian, On 2 February 2015 (pdf , 26 K, 2 pp.)

Link

 (Italian translation)

Sintesi

  1. Il Parlamento italiano non ha ancora ratificato l’accordo FATCA. Problemi per gli intermediari finanziari (15 aprile 2015)
  2. L’azione della Guardia di finanza in relazione agli adempimenti 231/01 (15 aprile 2015)
  3. Autoriciclaggio, prime riflessioni sul sistema giudiziario (15 aprile 2015)
  4. L’Italia in mano a lobby e conflitti di interesse (L’Espresso, 17 aprile 2015)
  5. Privacy: per i cookie adeguamento dei siti web entro il prossimo 3 giugno 2015
  6. Le considerazioni delle autorità di vigilanza italiane sulle valute virtuali (18 Aprile 2015)

Il Parlamento italiano non ha ancora ratificato l’accordo FATCA. Problemi per gli intermediari finanziari (15 aprile 2015)

L’iter legislativo per l’approvazione del disegno di legge di ratifica del Fatca (Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act) prosegue con lentezza e gli oltre nove mesi di ritardo dalla data del 1° luglio 2014 dalla quale avrà effetto retroattivo sono, sempre più, causa di difficoltà operative e legali per gli intermediari finanziari.
Nonostante lo scorso 8 aprile si sia concluso l’esame presso le Commissioni riunite del Senato, la discussione finale in Parlamento non risulta ancora calendarizzata e sono ancora molti gli aspetti implementativi poco chiari.
Dato l’elevato impatto sulle procedure che gli intermediari devono mettere in atto e le tempistiche sempre più stringenti imposte dalle normative internazionali, è giustificato il nervosismo degli operatori che si ritrovano ad attivare gli interventi di adeguamento ancora prima della ratifica delle leggi nazionali e nel contempo fronteggiare le difficoltà create dalle stesse autorità, non sufficientemente reattive nel mettere gli intermediari nelle condizioni di gestire in modo e a costi appropriati il rischio di compliance.

Link

L’azione della Guardia di finanza in relazione agli adempimenti 231/01 (15 aprile 2015)

L’8 Aprile 2015 la Guardia di Finanza (Gdf) ha reso pubblico il suo “Rapporto 20142 che presenta anche i risultati dei controlli in materia di responsabilità amministrativa degli enti, ai sensi di quanto previsto dal dlgs n. 231/2001.
Tale normativa prevede la punibilità delle aziende per alcune tipologie di reati commessi da amministratori, dirigenti o dipendenti.
La legge fornisce agli enti la possibilità di sfuggire a tali addebiti, predisponendo appositi modelli organizzativi di controllo e gestione dei rischi.
Ma i modelli 231, secondo quanto emerge dalle verifiche, sono in molti casi fittizi, ossia predisposti “sulla carta” ma privi di una reale capacità di monitoraggio e prevenzione.
In tale contesto, nel corso dei 219 interventi eseguiti nel 2014 gli uomini della Gdf hanno segnalato alle Procure 555 soggetti ed effettuato sequestri per 62 milioni di euro.

Allegati

Link

Autoriciclaggio, prime riflessioni sul sistema giudiziario (15 aprile 2015)

Il 13 aprile 2015 si è tenuto il convegno «Antiriciclaggio nella pubblica amministrazione. Il caso del comune di Milano».
Nel suo intervento Nicola Mainieri, dirigente della Banca di Italia ha sottolineato che il nuovo reato di autoriciclaggio sarà applicato in modo molto più diffuso rispetto al semplice reato di riciclaggio.
In Italia il reato di autoriciclaggio è stato introdotto nell’ordinamento penale con la legge 186/2014 (legge sulla voluntary disclosure) ed è in vigore dal 1° gennaio 2015.
Infatti l’autoriciclaggio è collegato al reato di riciclaggio ma si applica anche quando l’autore del reato di riciclaggio o non è imputabile o non è punibile ovvero manchi una condizione di procedibilità.
Ecco dunque che il reato di autoriciclaggio resta in vita anche quando il relativo reato di riciclaggio si è estinto.
Inoltre l’articolo 170 del codice penale recita che “quando un reato è il presupposto di un altro reato, la causa che lo estingue non si estende all’altro reato”.
E la Corte di cassazione con una sentenza del 2014 ha confermato che l’estinzione (per esempio, per prescrizione) del delitto non colposo presupposto del riciclaggio è priva di effetti sulla configurabilità del riciclaggio.
E quindi a maggior ragione il principio potrebbe essere esteso all’autoriciclaggio con delle conseguenze dirompenti.

Link

L’Italia in mano a lobby e conflitti di interesse (L’Espresso, 17 aprile 2015)

Secondo il rapporto “Lobbying in Europa” pubblicato da Transparency International l’Italia è un o dei paesi più arretrati nel combattere i conflitti di interesse e il potere delle lobby.
Il rapporto stila una classifica sulla base di tre macroindicatori:

  • la trasparenza al pubblico delle relazioni tra politici e lobbisti;
  • la regolamentazione sulla condotta etica degli stessi (integrità);
  • l’apertura del potere pubblico al pluralismo di voci e interessi (pari opportunità di accesso).

L’Europa è arretrata in questo campo rispetto a Stati Uniti e Canada e solo sette paesi tra quelli esaminati hanno una qualche norma sulle lobby: Austria, Francia, Irlanda, Lituania, Polonia, Slovenia (unico paese, come abbiamo visto, che ha uno “score” superiore al 50 per cento) e Gran Bretagna, sistemi nei quali è presente una forma di registrazione delle lobby e, nella maggioranza dei casi, anche un obbligo di comunicare periodicamente le proprie attività.
In Italia il governo ha istituito nel 2014  l’Autorità nazionale anticorruzione guidata da Raffaele Cantone e al Senato è in discussione un disegno di legge sulle lobby formato da quindici articoli.
Il primo articolo prevede che l’attività di lobbying deve «conformarsi ai principi di pubblicità, partecipazione democratica, trasparenza e conoscibilità dei processi decisionali, anche al fine di garantire una più ampia base informativa su cui i decisori pubblici possono fondare le proprie scelte».
C’è poi l’obbligo per i lobbisti di «predisporre una periodica relazione sull’attività svolta», mentre l’articolo 10 prevede l’obbligo per i decisori pubblici «di rendere nota l’attività di rappresentanza degli interessi, facendone menzione nella relazione illustrativa ovvero nel preambolo degli atti normativi e degli atti amministrativi».
L’articolo 11 rende infine incompatibile l’attività di lobbying con quella di giornalista,

Link

Privacy: per i cookie adeguamento dei siti web entro il prossimo 3 giugno 2015

L’anno scorso, il 3 giugno 2014, il Garante per la Privacy italiano ha pubblicato un provvedimento che richiede nuovi adempimenti in relazione all’uso dei cookie nei siti web.

Che cosa sono i cookie?

I cookie sono stringhe di testo di piccole dimensioni che i siti visitati dall’utente inviano al suo terminale (solitamente al browser), dove vengono memorizzati per essere poi ritrasmessi agli stessi siti alla successiva visita del medesimo utente. Nel corso della navigazione su un sito, l’utente può ricevere sul suo terminale anche cookie che vengono inviati da siti o da web server diversi (c.d. "terze parti"), sui quali possono risiedere alcuni elementi (quali, ad esempio, immagini, mappe, suoni, specifici link a pagine di altri domini) presenti sul sito che lo stesso sta visitando.
I cookie, solitamente presenti nei browser degli utenti in numero molto elevato e a volte anche con caratteristiche di ampia persistenza temporale, sono usati per differenti finalità: esecuzione di autenticazioni informatiche, monitoraggio di sessioni, memorizzazione di informazioni su specifiche configurazioni riguardanti gli utenti che accedono al server, ecc.

Il  provvedimento del Garante dell’8 maggio 2014 n. 229

Il provvedimento, pubblicato sulla Gazzetta Ufficiale del 3 giugno 2014, ha rafforzato le norme in materia di privacy online in particolar e in merito all’uso dei cookie e sistemi simili: gli utenti di internet devono essere maggiormente informati sull’esistenza di tali sistemi e su ciò che accade ai loro dati.
Sarà illecito utilizzare i cookie in mancanza di apposito consenso, soprattutto se utilizzati per raccogliere importanti e delicate informazioni all’insaputa degli utenti sui loro gusti, sulle loro abitudini e sulle loro scelte.
In considerazione delle caratteristiche tecniche che differenziano i cookie, il Garante ha individuato due macro-categorie sulla base delle finalità perseguite da chi li utilizza:

  • cookie “tecnici”
  • cookie “di profilazione”.

I cookie di profilazione “sono volti a creare profili relativi all’utente e vengono utilizzati al fine di inviare messaggi pubblicitari in linea con le preferenze manifestate dallo stesso nell’ambito della navigazione in rete. In ragione della particolare invasività che tali dispositivi possono avere nell’ambito della sfera privata degli utenti, la normativa europea e italiana prevede che l’utente debba essere adeguatamente informato sull’uso degli stessi ed esprimere così il proprio valido consenso”.

Link

Le considerazioni delle autorità di vigilanza italiane sulle valute virtuali (18 Aprile 2015)

Una sintesi delle opinioni delle autorità di vigilanza italiane su Bitcoin e sulle altre valute virtuali con le indicazioni, in particolare, di Banca d'Italia e UIF, l'Unità di informazione finanziaria.

  • Bank of Italy, Supervisory Bullettin n.1 2015, “Virtual currencies – Communication”, Italian, 30 January 2015 (pdf, 69 K, 2 pp.)
  • Bank of Italy, "Avvertenza sull’utilizzo delle cosiddette valute virtuali", Italian, 30 January 2015 (pdf, 180 K, 3 pp.)
  • UIF, Unità di Informazioni Finanziaria, “Anomalous use of virtual currencies”, Italian, On 2 February 2015 (pdf , 26 K, 2 pp.)

Weekly reviews

Other posts in English

ComplianceNet – detailed news for the week from April 12th to April 19th 2015 (in Italian)

ComplianceNet: